Author Topic: Sizing  (Read 643 times)

Offline Agrowingpair

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I’m having a mammogram done in mid July. I was wondering if someone here could tell me what kind of measurements are done during the scan do they measure the tissue by volume or?  And whatever measurement to use is there a way to determine how much growth you have and be able to translate that into cup size?  Over the last two years I have grown substantially.  I’ve been told that I am borderline for support but I can’t wrap my head around wearing anything. To be honest they don’t really bother me that much other than a bit of jiggling around.  
Would appreciate some insight, thanks.:)

Offline aboywithgirls

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Wearing a bra is certainly not the worst thing in the world that can happen to you. I've been wearing a bra for over 30 years and I've come to love it.. As a matter of fact I loved it as soon as I started wearing 1 at 12 years old. Half of the world's population wakes up every day and puts on their bra. We just happened to be a part of that half.

As far as bra sizing goes, the easiest way to figure it out is the following.Take a soft tape measure and measure just under your bust. That will give you your band size. Next next raise the Tape to the fullest part of your breast and take that measurement too.The difference between the 2 measurements will indicate your cup size. For example, if your underbust is a underbust is 36"And the fullest party of bust is 2" larger, 38".This is a difference of 2" which would indicate a b cup where an a cup would be a difference of 1"

However, I very very highly recommend getting fitted for your 1st bra.A professional fitter can help you with sizing style thing style and shape that you're looking for in a bra all of which are very important so you're comfortable and confident.Many men, especially here, who are ripped wearing a bra, are getting professionally fitted because they end up with a better result quicker and many places are very accustomed to fitting men nowadays.

Sophie ❤️ 
Bras aren't for women, they're for breasts.

Offline Orb

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Welcome,

  As to the question of growth and size a lot has been written on proper measurements.  Most sites have a bra calculator and help with that.  Many here wear support some times and at other times don't.  It all depends on you, the discomfort and activities you do that bother you.  There is no correct answer as to the size in which you would need to wear support.  Again individual preference. 

  Read through the acceptance section and you will learn a lot.

Offline Orb

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I was speaking in general terms. 
Sophie said it much better.
If you want a well fitting bras she is correct, get fitted.  Will save a lot of time and your going to get what you need in and out of the bra.;)
« Last Edit: June 29, 2022, 03:44:45 PM by Orb »

Offline 42CSuprise!

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Your question is rather unique because the measurements you're talking about are the kind that might be done during a scan to see if you have breast cancer.  I'm sorry you're going through that.  I hope it is routine and not the result of an exam that found a lump.  Men here with gynecomastia will occasionally have mammograms as part of their regular health checkup.  I've not done that but my breast growth has really escalated the last few years when COVID has made trips to the doctors office rare as hen's teeth.

I also read your comment that the breast growth you're experiencing is not a problem.  That said, you did ask about brassieres and two regulars chimed in.  I'm another person who hasn't felt the need to wear a brassiere, despite breast growth, but I am a person who wanted to experiment with the experience.  I've enjoyed it, but then I'm a bit kinky.  Looking for an attractive brassiere and then seeing how it can enhance the appearance of my breasts are things I enjoy.  I'm pretty certain others in this group feel the same, though they aren't as likely to say that.  There are good arguments in support of men wearing brassieres, but it is still far from the norm.  You'll have to decide for yourself whether you want to try a walk on the wild side.  Good luck with the scan.

Offline Agrowingpair

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I just wanna see if there’s anything to be concerned about. In roughly a two year. I went from a fat chest to enlarged Aerolas, larger nipples and what feels like definite growth. Both sides feel like somethings growing in there. I asked my doctor for a mammogram after he did a physical exam and he agreed just to make sure there’s no problems. But getting to that point is a major pain in the ass. It’s really all I want to do is verify and get the doctor to run a scan and  my blood work looks relatively OK but I have fluctuating up-and-down testosterone levels. Between 10 years ago and now I’ve gained about 65 pounds. The doctor thinks because of my weight gain is causing my T to convert to E through aromatase. I’m not on any medication‘s that would’ve triggered this that I know of I asked about going to an endocrinologist he wants to hold off until the results of the scanner back.  I’m just happy I’m getting the scan done.  And all I was asking about when it came to the scan is if they’re able to measure how much actual breast tissue you have on both sides and how dense is it and how far along is it like the Tanner stages.   Those are the things I’m curious about because to be honest I’m not a doctor I don’t know I’m trying to ask the professionals so they can tell me.  I’m in my mid-50s they really don’t bother me. If I was in my 20s I would probably opt for surgery but judging by the amount of growth that I have and from what I’ve seen online I think I would be looking at a major procedure and If they’re not causing me a health issue then why operate?!

Offline Denny

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I am in the same position. I will be seeing a doctor in about a month. I know because of my family history they will want a mammogram. I am now a 40C. I am also in my 50s and will not get surgery. I like to run and lately the only way I can run without pain is to wear a sports bra. I don't understand and am trying to figure things out one day at a time. You are not alone. 

Offline 42CSuprise!

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No doubt weight gain can affect our hormone balance.  In reading about causes of gynecomastia you'll generally see excess weight as a contributing factor... as  your doctor explains.  The Mayo Clinic says "Aging. Hormone changes that occur with aging can cause gynecomastia, especially in men who are overweight."  Many of us gained weight during COVID both because of changes in activity level and often emotional eating because of stress.  That certainly happened for me and, coincidentally, it was during this time that I began hanging out here AND experimenting with wearing a brassiere.  A 42C brassiere is carrying a significant amount of breast tissue, so it works for me even though I'd do fine without a brassiere.  And I don't wear one full-time.  This is all new territory to explore as you fellows are doing.  Good luck with the exam.  It is good to be with kindred spirits.

Offline 46bboobs

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Mammogram won't tell you sizing. Bra size charts are a rough guide, but keep in mind they tend to be off quite a bit for men.  Sizing will not only vary from mfg to mfg, but from bra to bra.

Offline JKing

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Mammogram won't tell you sizing. Bra size charts are a rough guide, but keep in mind they tend to be off quite a bit for men.  Sizing will not only vary from mfg to mfg, but from bra to bra.

Agreed. If you are older when gynecomastia sets in and have a very male shape, the standard way to measure for a bra will often give you too large of a cup size. This is because on average men will have bigger chest and back muscles.  According to the standard method I should be a C or D cup. but in reality the actual breast tissue just fills in an A Cup. 

Offline taxmapper

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Mammogram won't tell you sizing. Bra size charts are a rough guide, but keep in mind they tend to be off quite a bit for men.  Sizing will not only vary from mfg to mfg, but from bra to bra.

Agreed. If you are older when gynecomastia sets in and have a very male shape, the standard way to measure for a bra will often give you too large of a cup size. This is because on average men will have bigger chest and back muscles.  According to the standard method I should be a C or D cup. but in reality the actual breast tissue just fills in an A Cup.
^^^^This. 


Technically I am now a DD cup according to measurements.   I am 43-1/2 on the band and 50 on the bust. (Going to 51)  (inches).  Technically that makes me an F cup. But barely fill a B. 
Also remember that men have wider chests so the same amount of flesh that makes up a 34D on a woman though the same weight, is widely spread out on a mans chest. 
Still the same amount, but doesn't protrude like a woman's. 

Offline aboywithgirls

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Generally speaking. Men do have a more broad chest than most women. I think that if you have early onset gynecomastia during puberty, you will likely have more of a narrow, feminine shaped chest as well as a more feminine shaped breast. 

I was probably 10 or 11 years old when I started developing breasts.  I had early onset gynecomastia. I was wearing a 36D when I graduated high school. 

Every one is unique in breast size and shape. Even breasts on the same chest are not identical. I know that having a professional bra fitting is not for everyone. However it is usually the best way to get the best fit with a bra that suits your individual needs. 

Sophie ❤️ 


 

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