Author Topic: Son with gynecomastia  (Read 18490 times)

Offline Gynomom

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Johann, there are pros and cons to everything, aren’t there?

Offline JohannK

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Offline curiousk

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Gynomom, 

First, I commend you on taking control of the situation of dealing with your son having breasts at such a young age.  In early teen years, there are so many esteem issues that need to be dealt with.   This situation creates an incredibly unique challenge that no one is prepared to handle.   I feel that you are on the right track of educating yourself, asking for help and opening the lines of communication.
My situation sounds similar to your sons.   At about 10-11 years old, I started to develop breasts.   I was chubby as well, but there was no conversation about it.  Not from my parents, siblings, doctor, nobody.   When I got to 7th and 8th grade, I few guys and a lot of girls told me that I was big enough to wear a bra.   I could also see that my breasts were bigger than 70% of the girls in the 8th grade.  A little embarrassing, but I just kept it inside and deal that wit her it.  I played sports in school and gym classes weren’t a problem.   I had a great gym teacher who always made sure that I was a shirt and never a skin.   
High school wasn’t a big problem for me, outside of a few comments.   I was never touched or groped by anyone.   It’s hard to tell how big I was, probably a solid B cup for sure.   
I’ll fast forward to about a year ago when I stumbled upon this website and really started to seriously investigate to idea of wearing a bra.    In December 2019, I sat my wife and 2 sons( ages 21 and 18 )down to explain that I would feel more comfortable wearing a bra full time.  They were very supportive and told me that they loved me and do whatever I needed to do to be comfortable.   So I got fitted and have worn a bra daily since the middle of December.  I’m 50 years old and not interested in surgery.     Probably something I would have benefited from a long time ago.   While it would have been a bit embarrassing, I probably would have been more comfortable.  
My 18 year has gynecomastia too. He’s in the A/B range.   He’s a bit bothered by it, but doesn’t let it bother him.   I told him whatever way he chooses to deal with is ok as long as he loves himself.
I’m here to lend an ear or give advice, whichever you need.   Good luck to you and your son as both of you navigate your way to acceptance.   

Offline Gynomom

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Curiousk, your story is inspirational. Thank you for sharing it

DW20

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Maybe a bit late and a simplistic way of looking at things but if manufacturers make a bra (for women !!) in a size that  fits her it is  a sign that breasts of that size are recognised as needing support.
The same goes for your son. If there is  a bra made that fits, then his bust is big enough to need support.

I am 73 and have been fully bra'd up for around 3 years now and wished I'd taken the step a few years earlier. I have a very supportive wife - your son is very fortunate to have a very supportive Mum, I hope both he and yourself realise this.

I am father to 3 lovely girls  - when they had breasts big enough they had  bras, for one of them it was 32B at age 11  and there were idiots about telling my wife and I that she was far too young - especially for the styles that actually helped!!

Great to have a lady on the site  best wishes to  you both. I hope in whatever way you will help spread the news that not all male bra wearers are weirdos.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2020, 04:07:00 PM by DW20 »

Offline SideSet

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Haven’t heard from you in several months. Everything OK with you and your son?

Offline gynecoindia

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Wait for him to be 18 plus years old and if still, he has male breast then go for surgery.
keep eye on his eating habits and give him healthy food so that his hormone levels are balanced. Emotional support and letting him know the true facts will also help him emotionally cope up with the world.

Offline concernedjacob

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  • it is what it is
once past puberty and having established its glands and not fat, pay for his surgery.....

I can say this ruined my life completey and im 42 still havent done the surgery

save your sons mental health and life
just an older gyno sufferer

p.r.1974

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I hope that all is well in your world Gynomom!

It has been a minute. I do not with so bother you if your family has moved on.

Everyone's path is different from the varied responses here; a pinch or a bag of salt may be needed.

Know that we wish you well!

Offline Gynomom

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Can you believe it has been almost 4 years since I asked your advice here?  Everybody was so helpful and sweet, I thought I would give you an update.  My son was 12 then, now 16, and no longer my son.  You see, I found out Rene was gender fluid, and prefers Renee, she, her.  Does not see themselves at all as he.  Maybe, they at most.

Her breasts have not really gotten beyond B cup, which she almost was when I first wrote, but fully female.  And I must say, quite lovely.  She likes them, and that is all that matters.

Gynecomastia can be so hard on anyone, especially a young boy, I sometimes wonder if that is what caused her not to see herself as masc.  So, one question, did you see yourselves as less masculine because you had female breasts and did you tend to wear women's clothing more and choose to present as less masculine?  Well, maybe that is three questions ha ha.

I thought you might enjoy a few pix of Renee :)


Offline blad

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A surprising update with a happy ending. 
If the bra fits, wear it.

Online Justagirl💃

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So glad things worked out!

I was also a B cup in high school, and with wide hips (I'm a DDD now at 60). 

There is a hormonal stew that makes us grow breasts and wide hips, and it's called estrogen dominance. Estrogen effects much more than the physical, and in 'some individuals' it will effect their gender outlook as well. I was raised the first half of my teens as a tomboy, then dad took over and it was sports and testosterone treatments. I hated boy-mode and spent 45 'unhappy' years in it. 

It's always refreshing to see understanding parents. That wasn't the case back in the 70's. 

Renee looks great, and she looks very happy! 💞
When life gives you curves,
flaunt them! 💃
💋Birdie💋

p.r.1974

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It is indeed good to hear from you! Renee looks lovely and happy! Congratulations Renee on living your truth! I am sure you know that your path will not be easy, but nothing that is worth it ever really is!

Thank you for restoring my faith in humanity a bit more just being a loving and supportive parent! The world seemingly has become a bit more tolerant in some places, and not so much in others. Thank you for being an example! One never know the number of people that we affect just by being ourselves.

To the question....We are all unique individuals with a spectrum of variable life experiences that shape how we move forward. 

Some have always known and are adamant in not identifying with their gender assigned at birth. Some take a bit longer to get there, trying their best to fit a mold that just isn't right, and eventually transition in part or in full. Some are quite happy in their assigned identity and also have curves. Some are just pickled about being in the middle, and they spend their lives with their heads in the sand believing they were assigned correctly at birth, but their body keeps proving otherwise.

Offline Parity

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 Good to hear from you again.  I'm delighted for you an Renee.  I have to echo what was said about you being strong, willing to see your "son", Renee for who she really  is.  A wonderful and beautiful person.  Someone who can just be because of your willingness to be there and see deeper.

  For me the real breast development came later in life.  Looking back I always was in the middle of the gender scale.  Just being able to be me was a gift.  I did always like nice softer clothing and dressed as I felt comfortable.  Often wearing clothing deemed as woman's.   Now as the breast tissue has taken it's shape I continue to dress comfortable and for me.  The general public doesn't take the time to really see an individual for who they really are. There really are no boxes everyone try's to put others in.  We are all unique.  Just continue to encourage and support Renee as you have.  Loving on her as her beautiful light grows brighter.
 

Offline Busty

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What a cutie.  Such a pretty face.  Nice little figure.  She clearly has her own sense of style.  Since we are on a site about breasts and talking about bras, I particularly noticed the picture in the overalls.  She is braless and clearly has cute, perky breasts.  Still a B cup?

Thank you for closing the loop.  I know a number here have wondered and asked.  Not may would do what you have done.


 

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