Author Topic: Medical testing experiences  (Read 544 times)

Offline Justagirl💃

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Most of us have have been sent out for medical testing somewhere that the staff doesn't know you. 

Today it was my turn again, and of course my medical records proceeded me (the records say male). 

I arrived for my "stress test" in a button-up blouse and my Capris. I also styled my hair since I never leave the house without styling it nice. Checked in at registration okay, and waited. 

The tech walked right past me and asked if there was a Mr. **** after she scanned the room. I responded, "yes" and started heading her way. She kind of gave me a second glance over but said nothing. 

Fast forward to the imaging, and I was asked to remove my bra and keep my blouse unbuttoned for the electrodes. 
They were very careful in addressing me, never calling me sir or ma'am. 
As the electrodes were connected the tech would carefully cover my breasts over with my loose blouse like she would any other woman. Very professional!

The stress test followed. And again the doctor was very professional carefully lifting my breasts to connect the leads. He also covered them up very carefully during testing. 

Second imaging was done much like the first. Very professional. 
I was then left alone to put my bra back on and redress. 

Except for the very first time they called my name I was never addressed as a male, always treated very respectfully, and it was a very good medical visit. 

Not too bad for the state of Texas. 

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💋Birdie💋

Offline gotgyne

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I think doctors and their staff become more and more professional handling trans persons and non-binary individuals. Even as a male with some assumed female clothes like pantyhose they don't turn up their nose at the patient. More than a decade ago I had an appointment at a cardiologist. It was summer and I was wearing very short blue jeans shorts and a black support pantyhose. No problems with other patients at the waiting room and the doctor himself asked "have you got problems with your legs?" and I answered "yes" and this was it. I didn't need electrodes on my ankles thus I had not to put off the pantyhose. At the stress test the physician made for some time an ultrasound of my heart to look how the valves were working and it was all at it's best.
I'm sure even a bra on a man will not cause any astonishment with doctors.
By the way: In Germany yesterday the federal cabinet has passed a self-determination law for the right to sexual self-determination. After discussion at the parliament it will be legal next year that any adult person who looks upon him/herself as a member of the other sex can do this only by self-disclosure to the civil registry office. Minors between 14 to 18 years need the consent of a person having the custody. If they don't get it, they can appeal to the court which can overrule the custodian.
For minors under 14 years the custodian (usually the parents or one parent) must declare that the child looks upon him/herself as a member of the other sex.
This new law without any tests by psychologists is at least highly controversial or frankly it is disapproved by the vast majority of the German population not to mention the conservative christians and foremost the muslims.
A bra is just an article of clothing for people with breasts.

Online Sophie

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Early on, like 30+ years ago, there wasn't as much understanding. It wasn't terrible but it wasn’t either. 

I wore bra and panties every day since I was sixteen years old. In my younger years, I didn't have alot of reasons to bring me to the doctors. However I still had annual physicals. I would keep my bra and panties on and put on a hospital gown. The subject did come up. I justified my bra because of my gynecomastia and my panties with the fact that they were more comfortable and fit better. There was never any negative comments  but it was controversial enough back then that it was questioned. 

Its funny how many more doctors I have now compared to back then. I had a dentist and our family doctor then. Now, I have a PCP, a dentist, allergist, optometrist, endocrinologist, hematologist, and a gynecologist. 

They all know who I was and who I am. I'm still the same person. I'm just presenting myself a little different. 

♥️Sophie♥️

Offline Justagirl💃

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They all know who I was and who I am. I'm still the same person. I'm just presenting myself a little different.
I wish there was a way to get my medical records to reflect the "me" I am now. Seeing a new specialist is always just a bit awkward at first. 

Nothing is really said, but the first "glance" after they know my "name" is strange. 

I'll have staff welcome me as ma'am entering the building, then I check in as a dude, I of course get called back by my male name only to have "me" answer to it. 

It's a bit awkward 

Offline Justagirl💃

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Having gone through surgeries already I know the procedures, the nurse this time came in to mark my veins with a marker and ultrasound as usual but casually bumped up against my crotch area with her hand and then again as if not sure (I wear incontinence briefs).

The other nurse came in to clean the leg and prep it, but the first nurse whispered something into her ear.
She also accidentally bumped my crotch area, and then again as if not sure (didn't happen in previous surgeries).

It was actually very unprofessional of both of them, however I was barely containing my laughter at their confusion. I don't have a penis but rather something rather deformed in it's place (no bulge, more like enlarged clitoris).

After surgery one of the nurses stayed to help me sit up and brought my clothes over. She gazed down my blouse at my obvious chest and kind of giggled a bit but said nothing. I offered no explanation at all and carried on (my medical records they have say male).

I'm sure I was talked about at the nurse's station that day. This is Texas, and genders outside of the boxes are frowned upon, but they most likely have no idea that I was born this way. 😂

p.r.1974

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I am sorry that you had to go through this love! I would hope that those in the medical field know better, though it seems that sh*&&@ humans still exist in that world as well.

Offline Justagirl💃

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I am sorry that you had to go through this love! I would hope that those in the medical field know better, though it seems that sh*&&@ humans still exist in that world as well.
It was quite unprofessional of them, but I couldn't help but find their confusion hilarious. 

p.r.1974

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The dumbfounded expressions are indeed humorous. The unprofessionalism not so much.

Offline tryingtoaccept

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Sorry that happened to you Birdie but I am glad you can see the humor in it.  I always try to find the humor in every thing in life.
Redfox 🦊


 

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