Author Topic: Need a tip for my chest....  (Read 3343 times)

Offline soccerplaya

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are there different areas of the chest to work on? or is it just one muscle? Is there any way to build up the outside part of the chest on top of the rib cage next to the armpit ?

thanks

Offline Midwestdude

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There are different lifting exercises.  First, I'd certainly advise starting with lower weights, then gradually increasing.  Too much weight and you run the risk of torn muscle.  Bad news if that happens and a long road to recovery.

The chest is made up of different sets of muscles.  The traditional bench press (laying flat on your back) works the overall muscle.  Lifting when on an incline bench (your trunk lower than your chest) works the upper portion of the chest muscle (closer to your shoulders)and when on a decline bench, you work the area below the nipple area (I'd not recommend a lot of decline work unless your overall chest is already in pretty good definition.)

The side chest muscles are really worked as a result of the exercises described above.

Probably most important:
I've always heard that muscle definition (especially the chest and abs) is BUILT through weight training but HONED with diet.  The strongest muscles on the planet will still look average if they're covered in a thick layer of fat.  True patience and time will get you there...it's all a matter of how important it is to you.

Best of luck and have a wonderful 2006!

Offline soccerplaya

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thanks for the advice, I still have a tiny bit of stubborn fat (im 5-10, 145) I have really strong abs but my stomach dosent show it much really show it much, I play soccer and am in pretty good shape most of the time, I was always a tiny bit chubby when I was 10,11,12... it was probably baby fat.

Offline Bakajin

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the problem about asking for training advice on a non-related board is that the accuracy of the information is often pretty low.  Pecs being made up of multiple muscles that are targeted individually by different bench press exercises is a long standing bodybuilding myth, most likely started due to the difference in shape of people's pecs (which is largely due to genetics rather than training).

the pectoralis major is actually a single muscle with 2 heads at the sternum (lower) and the clavicular (upper).  This sometimes gives the impression of two muscles but both heads assist each other to the same degree when doing bench pressing movements and are a single muscle.  Research has shown that that different types of bench press make no difference to the development of the individual heads.  Some people believe though that major lat exercises (such as pullups and rows) that involve medial rotation of the shoulder and adduction of the shoulder can possibly help develop the sternum head although its likely both heads will be worked to an extent.

of course the best idea is to do some research articles yourself on the topic rather than this to random internet posters such as myself  8)  a good article on various training myths from powerlifting USA can be found here;

http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/13/coaching/coaching.html

Offline bignipCT

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Quote
the problem about asking for training advice on a non-related board is that the accuracy of the information is often pretty low.  Pecs being made up of multiple muscles that are targeted individually by different bench press exercises is a long standing bodybuilding myth, most likely started due to the difference in shape of people's pecs (which is largely due to genetics rather than training).

the pectoralis major is actually a single muscle with 2 heads at the sternum (lower) and the clavicular (upper).  This sometimes gives the impression of two muscles but both heads assist each other to the same degree when doing bench pressing movements and are a single muscle.  Research has shown that that different types of bench press make no difference to the development of the individual heads.  Some people believe though that major lat exercises (such as pullups and rows) that involve medial rotation of the shoulder and adduction of the shoulder can possibly help develop the sternum head although its likely both heads will be worked to an extent.

of course the best idea is to do some research articles yourself on the topic rather than this to random internet posters such as myself  8)  a good article on various training myths from powerlifting USA can be found here;

http://www.usapowerlifting.com/newsletter/13/coaching/coaching.html


very interesting, i will look into that, an i actually know a somewhat good amount about training

Offline Midwestdude

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I agree that it's wise to conduct more thorough research on a site independent of this.  Several sites in fact would be best.  The gnye forum simply isn't geared toward it.

I don't agree on the use of the word "myth" however.  

When it comes muscle development you'll certainly find just as many opinions on training as there are people out there doing it.  Genes play a part, "muscle memory" plays a part and how ones own body responds to various lifting exercises plays a huge part.  It's definitely not one size fits all.  While lifters may have their own favorites, when it comes to training exercises, most of the well known body builders combine several different chest exercises...and I don't think it's simply to break up the boredom.


 

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