Author Topic: I am glad  (Read 1666 times)

Offline taxmapper

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The "pink brain" thing is something I have long wondered about myself. 

having had images in the past and questions as to why I don't have hips or why I cant wear certain clothing, etc. 

Obviously the hormones have an effect. 

but it also makes me wonder if the changes being perfectly natural overall, is something we should fight. 

Offline Confused old man

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The "pink brain" thing is something I have long wondered about myself.

having had images in the past and questions as to why I don't have hips or why I cant wear certain clothing, etc.

Obviously the hormones have an effect.

but it also makes me wonder if the changes being perfectly natural overall, is something we should fight.

I’m not going to fight the natural occurrence of change. I have talked to others about testosterone treatments. Some had side effects that made them go off the treatments. Some told me of anger issues. So having very low T is something I’m going to live with. I gained weight in my butt and thighs and my boobs grew. I wear bras and bought clothes that fit my shape better. The mental aspect of it all has made me much calmer. Things don’t bother me like the used to. Me and others around me like the new me. Pink brain?..maybe, whatever it is, I am learning to appreciate the change. Unvoluntary feminization?...I’m fine with that.not going to fight it.

Offline 42CSuprise!

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From my reading on this forum over time I get the sense most of us either are or have been in relationship with a woman at some point in our lives.  I've reflected on what it is that draws me to be with a woman.  One thing is pretty clear... these women have greater access to their emotions and greater capacity for empathy.  I welcomed those qualities even when as a younger man I had difficulty accessing my own emotions.  I appreciated feeling understood emotionally.  As I've gotten older and my body has changed, I find myself with much greater access to my emotions and an increasing capacity for empathy.  I hadn't really made the connection with gynecomastia until I began researching the subject both here and elsewhere.  It surely isn't rocket science to note that our breasts are evidence of more estrogen in our bodies.  Should it surprise us that along with breasts we'd find changes in our emotions?

There was an old television commercial touting the wonder of butter that spoke about margarine saying "it's not nice to fool with Mother Nature."  We come by our unique hormone stew honestly.  For those of us who've dealing with this since adolescence we're simply playing the cards we've been dealt.  No doubt we've struggled mightily with the circumstances since children can be cruel.  Adults can be cruel as well we learned.  Anything that makes us different becomes an opportunity for some insecure people to shame us.  Fleshy chests don't fit with the male ideal.  But what were we to do... beside trying to lose weight and feverishly working out at the gym?  Those solutions didn't work, and so we continued our often lonely journey... until we arrived here, or one of the other websites where men dare to discuss the benefits of wearing a brassiere... or reflecting on gender identity and sexual orientation.  Developing breasts opens all kinds of questions and leads to all kinds of life choices.  We know from what Sophie shares, what Dale and others have shared, that there is not a one size fits all response.  Respecting what others discover about themselves and then how they choose to live with their circumstances is important.  Self-acceptance is never predicated on demeaning choices made by other people.  Finding kindred spirits who understand and respect what we're doing is a great gift.  I didn't expect that would be what this website would be for me... but it has been.  Thank you everyone for sharing your experience.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2022, 03:52:15 PM by 42CSuprise! »

Offline aboywithgirls

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The "pink brain" thing is something I have long wondered about myself.

having had images in the past and questions as to why I don't have hips or why I cant wear certain clothing, etc.

Obviously the hormones have an effect.

but it also makes me wonder if the changes being perfectly natural overall, is something we should fight.
I'm not sure if I am the best one here to offer any advice on this, however I can speak to my own experiences.

Estrogen and I go way back, pretty much as early as 4 or 5 years old. I remember having thoughts about how I wanted to be a girl. As I approached my tween years, I began to develop more feminine characteristics than most boys. I was not scared of the fact that I was growing breasts and hips while the boys were growing muscles and chest hair. I got to the point, which most of you know that my mother suggested that a bra would be of help to me. Again, this didn't bother me, it made sense. I had boobs like my mother and older sister and they wore bras, I should probably wear one too. At 16, my mother brought me for my first bra fitting and I ea fifilling out a 34C. I also decided for myself that I preferred panties the same day and have worn nothing but since.

I also know that I have never had any typical male traits. I have never been a fighter or aggressive. I have always been naturally submissive but I have tried the dominant role in the bedroom on occasion. I have also taken pride in my ability to emphasize with other's feelings. My closest friends are and have been women. I think that this is because women are better listeners and aren't afraid to cry with you. I know that men hide their emotions more whether it's happiness or sadness. I have never kept my emotions under those sort of gender constraints. I couldn't. 

Just me being me is a blessing. When I came out at work as me, the comment that I heard from almost every girl I work with was the same "It's about time, girl" or " We've been waiting to finally meet you". Even they knew on some level that I was fully enveloped in the pink fog.

I'm not saying that anyone here should transition. I do however believe that there is no black or white when it comes to male and female. I believe that there are 100 billion shades of gray to the gender spectrum.

😍🥰❤️💋❤😂❣️👩‍🦰
I love all of you guys, girls, and people
your sister,
Sophie 
Bras aren't for women, they're for breasts.

Offline Aussie63

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The "pink brain" thing is something I have long wondered about myself...

...but it also makes me wonder if the changes being perfectly natural overall, is something we should fight.
For me, the "pink brain" thing is something that I have only wondered about comparatively recently. Even though there were certain instances since my youth that point to it and probably gave me reason to question, it's only after joining the dots lately that I have been able to acknowledge my certain level of pinkness and even enjoy it. 

Fight it? No way!
Evolving. And....loving it!

Offline gotgyne

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The "pink brain" thing? This was new to me and I had to do a little research at first. Do you refer to the book "Pink Brain, Blue Brain" by Lise Eliot? Well, I clearly see differences in the habits of men and women. At school for example I was never keen on sports and competitions. I didn't like mathematics but preferred languages, geography and history. I liked reading books. These habits are attributed to girls. These are neurological and psychological issues. But even on the physical level I seem to resemble women more than men. So my connective tissue seems to be "female", since the physiotherapist I've mentioned in the thread on shapewear told me that she never before saw a male client with such a weak tissue. I developed varicose veins at a relatively young age, have a sagging belly and fleshy thighs with only modest overweight and developed an inguinal hernia which had to be repaired surgically. But strange yet that I developed gynecomastia not at puberty but in my 40s and this obviously because of my spironolactone medication.
A bra is just an article of clothing for people with breasts.


 

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